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    The Douglas Hyde Gallery, an Irish contemporary art gallery, will display Josef Sudek’s photographs selected from PPF Group’s collection
    11/14/2016

    The exhibition is being co-organised by the Embassy of the Czech Republic to Ireland. 

    Josef Sudek 
    Exhibition of photographs from PPF Group’s collection of Czechoslovak and Czech photographs
    The Douglas Hyde Gallery, Gallery 1 (Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland)
    17 November 2016 – 1 February 2017
    Opening
    | Thursday, 17 November 2016 at 6pm
    Exhibition curator | John Hutchinson, Director, The Douglas Hyde Gallery

    The Douglas Hyde Gallery, a contemporary art gallery in the centre of Dublin, Ireland, will display a selection from the works of Josef Sudek, one of the most acclaimed Czech photographers, from mid-November to the beginning of February next year. The exhibition, organised in the year marked by 120th anniversary of Sudek’s birth, and 40 years since his passing, will show photographs created at the beginning of his work in the period of pictorialism, mystic pictures from Prague streets and nooks and from the Czech rural landscape, and also original bromide paper prints. PPF Art has provided the photographs from its collection for the exhibition, while the Embassy of the Czech Republic to Ireland is co-organising the exhibition. 

    “PPF Group’s collection of photographs currently numbers 1,800 pieces by 150 authors. Josef Sudek’s photographs became its foundation at the beginning of the millennium. However, the purpose of collectorship is not only to amass works of art but also to share their beauty with broader audiences. We are delighted that thanks to the personal commitment of the Czech Ambassador to Ireland, Mrs Hana Mottlová, we are able to present a Czech photographer’s works to Irish audiences through the Douglas Hyde Gallery. A number of international corporations are based in Dublin and we therefore believe that their employees will also visit the exhibition, and that we will thereby help to promote the knowledge and propagation of Czech culture not only in Ireland”, says Jan Řehák, the CEO of PPF Art, a company which is a part of PPF Group. The Douglas Hyde Gallery is located at the premises of the best Irish university, Trinity College Dublin: thus young people, students from Ireland and from all over the world, can get familiar with Josef Sudek’s photographs, too. 

    In the Czech Republic, PPF Art promotes the legacy of Josef Sudek not only by displaying his works but also by operating a renowned Prague gallery, Josef Sudek Studio, which is a replica of Josef Sudek’s photographic studio in which he spent a large part of his life working, but which burned down. 

    John Hutchinson, the Douglas Hyde Gallery Director, is a long-standing admirer of Josef Sudek’s works and has sought to organise an exhibition of his works for several years. The Josef Sudek exhibition will round off a trio of photography exhibitions that document different approaches to recording things happening here and now. 

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